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Nothing less than a reformation’

first_imgKrista Tippet, Peabody Award-winning journalist and broadcaster of the radio program “On Being”, spoke as this year’s Christian Culture lecturer at Saint Mary’s on Tuesday in O’Laughlin Auditorium.   The lecture, titled “Civic Healing and Christian Virtue in the 21st Century,” focused on issues of reforming modern Christian society. Tippet said the modern, technologically driven century forces society to reexamine questions they considered answered.  “We are reimagining the very nature of authority, of leadership, of community,” Tippet said. “We are fundamentally reconsidering how we structure our lives together. We are in the midst of nothing less than a reformation, but this time it’s all of the institutions including education, economies, politics, and religion. The interesting and challenging thing about this moment is that we know the old ways aren’t working, but we can’t yet see what the new forms will be.” Tippet said words shape how people understand the world, how they understand themselves and how they treat others. She said, in this light, tolerance is a problematic word for people of faith.  “Tolerance was the primary civic virtue we chose to navigate difference. And I think this word was always problematic,” she said. “Tolerance connotes allowing, enduring and indulging. In the medical context where it comes from, tolerance is about the limits of thriving in an unfavorable environment.  “Now I’m not saying that tolerance doesn’t have value and doesn’t have its place but it’s not a big enough word, and don’t think its ever a big enough word, for people of faith. Tolerance doesn’t ask us to care for the stranger. Tolerance doesn’t even bid us to know each other, to understand, to listen, to be curious.” Tippet said Christians need to rediscover the way in which questions can be spiritual virtues and civic tools.  “A simple question is not the same thing as the wrong question. I think what I’m talking about here is intentionality in our questions and acknowledgment of something,” Tippet said. “I know very well that questions are powerful things, questions elicit answers in their image. A simplistic question elicits a simplistic answer; an inflammatory question elicits an inflammatory answer. There is something redemptive and life giving about asking a better question.” Tippet said science demonstrates that humans don’t do their best thinking when afraid, but rather that is when they do their worst.   “Fear shuts down imaginations rather than opening them up, and depending how vulnerable we are to fear it sends us sheltering back with our tribe, behind our barricades, and makes creative open hearted encounter with the other almost impossible,” she said.    Tippet said humans are complicated creatures and change takes time. She said she is encouraged by the possibility of this societal conversation working when people are realistic and start small.   “My encouragement is to honor the difficulty of what we face, the complexity of what it means to be human,” Tippet said. “To be realistic about how difficult this has been up until now. To start small, to realize for example the critical importance of the creation of safe places before anything can happen, to realize we can immediately take part in this work,” she said.  The annual Christian Culture lecture is sponsored by the Humanistic Studies Department and honors the late Saint Mary’s professor Bruno Schlesinger.last_img read more

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Business Development Specialist To Explain Revamped PPP Funding

first_imgMGN ImageJAMESTOWN – A Jamestown area business development specialist will spend time next week helping local businesses understand the expanded Paycheck Protection Program.The Chautauqua County Chamber of Commerce is hosting a virtual Zoom meeting with Dr. Courtney Curatolo, the Director of the Small Business Development Center at SUNY JCC, on Tuesday.In December lawmakers passed another round of PPP funding to help businesses impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.The program, which reopened for community financial institutions (CFIs) earlier this week, will open for lenders with $1 billion or less in assets on Friday and for all lenders next week. Known as the Economic Aid Act, the program rebooted PPP with $284.5 billion in fresh funding, changed the existing rules regarding increases to PPP loans made to first-time borrowers.Under previous rules, a PPP loan could not be increased unless the loan was made to a partnership or seasonal employer and the lender approved the increase before submitting the initial SBA Form 1502 report for the loan.Section 312 of the Economic Aid Act scraps the Form 1502 restriction and provides for additional narrow circumstances under which increased PPP loans would be allowed.Dr. Curatolo will explain how businesses can get additional funding through the program and the from the Economic Injury Disaster Loan Advance Grant.The program, which is part of the Chamber’s Tuesday Talks series, starts at 8:30 a.m. with participants registering online first at chautauquachamber.org Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Cicada killers

first_imgFemale cicada killers, also called giant cicada killers or sandhornets, use their stingers to paralyze cicadas, noisy insectsthat live in nearby trees. The best control is prevention. Because cicada killers nest inopen areas without vegetation, healthy turf won’t be attacked.The best way to prevent having cicada killers around is tocultivate a lush healthy lawn without bare patches. Although virtually harmless, cicada killers can invade your homelandscape and make a mess with their horseshoe dens. If controlis necessary, locate the nests during the daylight hours andtreat after dark when female wasps are in their nests. Rememberto wear protective clothing. People who have caught female cicada killer wasps claim the stingis less painful than that of a wasp or bee, she added. Lone flyers Measuring almost two inches long, sporting yellow markings acrossa robust body and patrolling the ground with red wings and yellowlegs, cicada killer wasps look intimidating. Although they lookfierce and threatening, they’re more buzz than bite. Before deciding to do away with the insects, Hinkle urges you toremember, “as is apparent from their name, they are predators oncicadas, so they provide good biological control of these pestsof ornamental trees and shrubs.” “So, remember, the more aggressive cicada killers are males,which are all show and no substance. They hope to be able toscare you away by bluffing, but when it comes down to it, there’snothing they can do to you – or any other predator,” she said.”The females are otherwise occupied and can’t be distracted, sopose no threat. Because they are so innocuous – and so beneficial- it is best to leave them alone and just enjoy their beauty andfascinating behaviors.” By April ReeseUniversity of Georgiacenter_img “Cicada killer wasps show up around the first of August inGeorgia and may be seen for about a month,” she said. “BySeptember, adult cicada killers will have mated, provisionedtheir burrows with cicadas for the larvae, laid their eggs, anddied.” “As big as female cicada killers are, they still have a hard timelumbering through the air with a cicada, so often they paralyzeit, drop it from the tree, and then drag it along the ground,”Hinkle said. “Although these wasps are very large, they usually ignorepeople,” said Nancy Hinkle, an extension entomologist with theUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “Theindividuals patrolling the ground are males, which cannot stingand are harmless. Females are rarely seen because they are busyhunting cicadas and must be provoked to sting.” “Females are rarely seen because they are busy up in the trees,looking for cicadas to bring back and bury in the ground fortheir larvae to feed on,” she explained. “While the females arecapable of stinging, they are shy and must be forced to sting.” “These strikingly colored wasps are particularly noticeablebecause of their size and the fact that they fly close to theground,” Hinkle said. Cultural control Cicada killers are solitary wasps, unlike most other wasps, suchas hornets, yellow jackets and paper wasps who live in socialgroups. Cicada killers live in solitary units where each femaledigs her own burrow, six to 10 inches deep and as much as sixinches horizontally, to lay her eggs. They prefer to burrow in well-drained or sandy soils, making ahorseshoe shaped mound beside the hole. Each burrow can have asmany as 20 eggs, each in an individual cell, and each egg canhave as many three cicadas to feed on in its cell. last_img read more

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GlidePath to add storage to eight existing wind projects—a first for Southwest Power Pool

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Energy Storage News:GlidePath Power Solutions has acquired eight wind projects in North Texas with a total capacity of 149MW. The portfolio, purchased from Exelon Generation, will be optimized by GlidePath while it plans how best to add energy storage on-site at each project. The projects are all north of Amarillo and sell into the Southwest Power Pool (SPP).Chris McKissack, Chief Operating Officer for GlidePath told Energy Storage News: “We believe there’s an opportunity to build out storage facilities up to the nameplate capacity of the wind farms in the portfolio. There’s great potential for storage to reduce transmission congestion and improve the economics of wind farms in SPP and other markets.”According to GlidePath, they will be the first battery storage projects in the SPP.“The high penetration of wind energy in North Texas offers us an excellent opportunity to pair these facilities with the latest battery storage technology,” said David Braun, president, GlidePath Asset Management. “We look forward to managing these wind assets in a way that will hopefully strengthen the reliability of supply in the local electric grid and deliver benefits for Texas power consumers.”In June, SPP revealed that it would launch the Western Energy Imbalance Service market (WEIS) with settlements every five minutes. The previous balancing market run by SPP was launched in 2007 and paid out US$103 million in its first year.GlidePath has a 1GW battery storage development portfolio, including a 10MW /10MWh project in Texas announced in April this year.More: GlidePath acquires 149MW Texas wind portfolio with storage additions planned GlidePath to add storage to eight existing wind projects—a first for Southwest Power Poollast_img read more

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Seeing Red

first_img 1 2 3 4 5 Mention the Red River Gorge to a rock climber and he’s likely to start salivating. Kentucky’s Red has more than 200 miles of steep sandstone cliffs and has become a mecca for sport and trad climbers in the last few decades. It is a world-class climbing destination in the East rivaled only by the New River Gorge. But mention the Red to a hiker who might not think that clinging to a cliff by his fingertips 100 feet above the ground is a fun thing to do on a Saturday, and you might be met with a blank stare. Particularly if that hiker hails from outside of the Bluegrass State.“The amount of use in the Red per square foot far exceeds most other national forest units and is actually on par with most national park units,” says Charlie Rowe, a forest service ranger who leads a volunteer maintenance crew inside the Red. “But most of those visitors are from either Louisville or Cincinnati.”Particularly for those of us who live on the eastern flank of the Appalachian Mountains, we have so many outdoor destinations in our own backyard, we don’t think of driving four hours into Kentucky to get our boots dirty. But we should. The Red River Gorge is a federally designated “Geological Area,” with the highest concentration of natural stone arches east of the Rocky Mountains. There are more than 100 of these stone bridges scattered throughout the 29,000-acre area, popping out of the forest like a sketch in Dr. Seuss’ notebook. It’s as if a slice of the arch-rich Utah landscape has been transplanted to the Southern Appalachians. And every one of them is off limits to climbers, which means the lion’s share of Red users don’t bother tracking them down.center_img last_img read more

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Race Ahead: Mountain Biking

first_imgPhoto by Brad AllenMOUNTAIN BIKINGSnake Creek Gap Time Trialdahlonega, georgiaJanuary–March, 2013Locals call it “The Snake,” and the name says it all. Beautiful, but deadly. The course is 32 miles of the Pinhoti Trail in North Georgia, ridden three times over three months in the dead of winter. Fastest time wins. “It’s the only trail I’ve ever cursed at,” says 2011’s singlespeed champ Eric Nicoletti. “The first 17 miles are pretty standard. A little uphill, a little downhill. Some rocks and roots. Then you’re going along the ridgeline and the rocks get bigger and bigger until eventually, you’re trying to get around home-appliance-sized rocks. Then you’ve got Bruce Dickman, the race announcer. He gets out there on the course with a bullhorn and heckles the racers.” snake.nwgasprba.orgMassanutten Hoo-Hamassanutten resort, virginiaJune 8-9, 2013The Hoo-Ha is two days of racing on Massanutten’s Western Slope, a semi-private singletrack course lovingly maintained by the Shenandoah Valley Bicycle Coalition. Racers choose from 12-mile XC course or the 32-mile XXC course. If you’re more gravity inclined, you’ve got a short track race or the Super D, a fast race over a 3.5-mile course that begins high on Massanutten Mountain and challenges your downhill endurance. The Hoo-Ha is the jewel in the Triple Crown East Series, a mountain bike event series that also includes the Bump n’ Grind in Alabama and the Fontana Dam Jam in North Carolina. massresort.comChomolungma Challengesnowshoe mountain, west virginiaAugust, 2013One of the South’s newest races, the Chomolungma may also be one of the region’s most unique. It’s an enduro downhill event, with riders bombing laps on Snowshoe’s bike park in the steep Western Territory. The fastest biker to drop the elevation of Mount Everest wins. Here’s a numbers breakdown to whet your appetite.1,500 feet—Vertical drop per lap20—Number of laps you’ll ride29,035 feet—Total elevation you’ll drop, the reverse height of Everest.Chomolungma—Traditional Tibetan name for Mount Everest.ride.snowshoemtn.comShenandoah Mountain 100stokesville, virginiaSeptember, 2013The SM100 is the original mountain bike sufferfest. It was the first 100-mile mountain bike race on the East Coast on singletrack, founded by   race director Chris Scott.15 years ago, why put on a 100-miler? We needed a bigger, better adventure on the East Coast. It was kind of the heyday of 24 hour races, but we felt going around in circles was missing something. We wanted bigger terrain. When I came up with the 100-mile idea, my friends didn’t think it was possible. We hadn’t ridden 100 miles on trail before. This was the first trail-based 100 miler on the East Coast.What makes the race so popular?The trails. The trails here are just so good. The beer from Starr Hill helps too.What’s your favorite part of the course?We designed the course around the Chestnut Ridge downhill. It’s 10 miles of downhill that starts so high up, so far out there in the backcountry. We put it near the end of the race so everyone remembers it. Personally, my favorite trail on the course is Dowells Draft. You’re surfing sidehill for five miles.Anything big planned for the 15th anniversary?We’ll have brand new trail to ride. We just finished building two miles of trail that goes up Narrow Back Mountain, the first mountain you ride on the course. It’s rocky, with huge school-bus-sized boulders.mtntouring.comPisgah Stage Racebrevard, north carolinaOctober, 2013Make no mistake, signing up for the Pisgah Stage Race is a commitment. Five long days of riding infamous Pisgah singletrack is not to be taken lightly. “You’re racing the best cross-country bikers in the South,” says Kym Schifino, the overall women’s winner in 2012. “The climbs are brutal, but at the top, you have a world-class downhill. It’s impossible not to have fun on Black Mountain. That’s my absolute favorite trail on the course. Pure downhill fun, and a lot of the stages end with it. Yes, there’s some hike-a-bike. Farlow Gap is the toughest part of the race. It’s full of rocks that you have to carry your bike over, and you slip and turn an ankle. It’s just as easy to wreck walking Farlow as it is riding it.” blueridgeadventures.netBest of the RestFontana IcycleFontana Village, North CarolinaJanuary, 2013 • icyclerace.comCohutta 100Ocoee Whitewater Center, TennesseeApril 27, 2013 • trailheadoutdoors.comDragon’s TaleNew Castle, VirginiaApril, 2013 • mtntouring.comMiddle Mountain MamaDouthat State Park, VirginiaMay 5, 2013 • mountainbikevirginia.comPisgah 111kBrevard, North CarolinaMay 18, 2013 • pisgahproductions.comTHULE Urban AssaultRichmond, VirginiaMay 18, 2013 • dominionriverrock.comCole Subaru Crying Wolf ChallengeBluefield, West VirginiaMay 19, 2013  • cryingwolfchallenge.comBurn 24-Hour ChallengeWilkesboro, North CarolinaMay 25, 2013 • burn24hour.comTrans-Sylvania Mountain Bike EpicState College, PennsylvaniaMay 26-June 1, 2013 • tsepic.comGran Fondo Alleghany HighlandsCovington, VirginiaJuly 12-14, 2013 • visitalleghanyhighlands.comGeorgia Singlespeed State ChampionshipHartwell, GeorgiaSeptember, 2013 • gsschamp.comBaker’s DozenForks Area Trail System, South CarolinaOctober, 2013 • sorbacsra.orgSwank 65Brevard, North CarolinaNovember, 2013 • blueridgeadventures.netNorth Carolina Cyclocross SeriesVarious locations, North CarolinaOctober-January, 2013-14Virginia Cyclocross SeriesVarious locations, VirginiaOctober-December, 2013For more great Race Ahead information check out these sections:SnowsportsTrail RunningRoad RunningMountain BikingRoad CyclingClimbingPaddlingHikingMultisportSuperlativeslast_img read more

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Central American Gangs, a Mafia With a Thousand Heads

first_imgBy Dialogo September 22, 2010 The organized-crime gangs that plague Central America, known as ‘maras,’ keep various governments on edge as the latter multiply laws and regulations to combat the thousands of members of these groups, which arose a quarter of a century ago in the Hispanic neighborhoods of Los Angeles. The ‘mara’ phenomenon is concentrated in the so-called Northern Triangle, made up of Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras, countries characterized by poverty and by family disintegration due to migration. “The research carried out during the last fifteen years demonstrates that these gangs are the result of the confluence of social, economic, political, institutional, and geopolitical factors,” the director of the Public Opinion Institute at Central American University (UCA), Jannet Aguilar, declared to AFP. Aguilar, a sociologist, explained that the maras are also the result of “dysfunctional families that do not carry out their role of guardianship” and of states that privilege repression and do not encourage “true” educational and employment opportunities. In El Salvador, where the phenomenon is strongest, the maras are true mafia organizations that are involved in trafficking drugs and arms, extortion, and kidnapping and gave a demonstration of their power at the beginning of this month when they imposed a three-day bus strike in order to try to prevent the promulgation of a law banning them. This law establishes that “so-called gangs or maras such as Mara Salvatrucha, MS 13, Mara 18, Mara Máquina, Mara Mao Mao are illegal and are banned” and sets prison terms – for membership alone – of seven to ten years for leaders and six years for others. There are currently around 7,000 gang members imprisoned in El Salvador, but it is estimated that there may be between 9,000 and 20,000 more on the streets, since many teenagers are recruited every day, according to the police. Mara 18 and Mara Salvatrucha, the two most famous gangs, arose in the 1980s in the “Latino” neighborhoods of Los Angeles and became widespread in Central America following the deportation of thousands of immigrants from the United States to their countries of origin. The “maras,” an abbreviation of “marabunta,” a voracious ant from the Amazon, have thousands of members in countries such as Guatemala and Honduras, where crime rates are also among the highest in Latin America. “For the government, it’s necessary to increase control over groups of this kind (gangs) in order to implement measures to make it possible to combat and prevent violence,” Salvadoran president Mauricio Funes declared. Nevertheless, the human-rights ombudsman, Oscar Luna, has played down the impact of the law. Luna has called on the authorities not to create “false expectations” that the law will put an end to gangs, which are accused of a large share of the country’s high number of homicides: an average of thirteen a day. Some Salvadoran judges have also warned that the law “does not solve the problem of crime,” while other Central American countries – Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua – fear that it will lead Salvadoran gang members to emigrate there. For example, Guatemala, which is plagued by Mexican organized crime operating on its territory, has strengthened its vigilance to prevent the arrival of members of the Salvadoran maras. Gang members’ activities are added to those of the drug cartels. Mexican and Colombian drug traffickers have for years had “linkages” by way of Central America, a transit corridor for the cocaine they ship from South America to North America, causing a deterioration in the level of security.last_img read more

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Equels honored for heroism

first_img For service in Vietnam Equels honored for heroism Florida litigator Thomas K. Equels, an Army aviator who was honored seven times for heroism in Vietnam, has been inducted in the Distinguished Flying Cross Society, comprised exclusively of war heroes who received the highest honor for military flying.During his service in Vietnam, Equels was awarded two Distinguished Flying Crosses, the Purple Heart, the Bronze Star, 15 air medals including three with “V” devise for valor, and the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry.“I was a helicopter gunship pilot facing combat almost every day,” said Equels, managing director of the law firm Holtzman Equels. “The war taught me to be totally calm and clear in highly challenging situations.”Equels will be recognized during an annual ceremony in San Diego this fall.Equels’ first Distinguished Flying Cross was awarded for a rescue mission during the first days of the 1972 “Spring Offensive” when five divisions of the North Vietnamese Army invaded the south. Equels was the co-pilot of a Cobra helicopter gunship conducting aerial reconnaissance when Camp Carroll, an allied firebase, was being overrun by several thousand North Vietnamese troops. While the allied troops sought emergency shelter in a bunker at the center of the firebase, Equels provided suppressive gunfire, driving back the enemy forces. A Chinook helicopter then landed and rescued the surviving allied soldiers as Equels’ Cobra took over 50 hits from enemy fire while covering the evacuation.Equels earned a second Distinguished Flying Cross for bravery during a battle near the town of Tian Phuoc. As a heavily armed brigade of North Vietnamese attacked this outpost of allied troops, Equels engaged the enemy, providing close fire support and slowed the approaching attack. Two enemy tanks then joined the attack. Unfortunately, bad weather prevented U.S. Air Force fighter jets, typically used to destroy such tanks, from joining the battle. Assisted by a second Cobra, Equels attacked and not only wiped out the two tanks, but inflicted massive casualties on the enemy.“I was a 19-year-old who believed in creating a world of free people living in democratic institutions,” Equels said. “When I returned from Vietnam, I became a lawyer, determined to devote a part of my practice to social justice. I still think that we can change the world for the better, a little bit at a time, by dealing with everyday matters that are within our power and abilities. No matter how difficult things become, the willingness of brave citizens to serve is what counts. Whether serving as a helicopter pilot in combat or serving food at a church soup kitchen for the homeless, our country and our communities depend on such service. It is vital to the preservation of liberty and our democratic institutions.”Among his professional achievements, Equels, obtained a $44-million judgment against Manuel Noriega for money he misappropriated from the Republic of Panama.As a community leader, Equels received the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Community Service Award in 1995, the Guild of Catholic Lawyers’ St. Thomas Moore Award in 1991, as well as The Florida Bar President’s Pro Bono Service Award, and the Federal Bar Association’s Public Service Award in 1987. September 15, 2003 Regular Newscenter_img Equels honored for heroismlast_img read more

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Japan lacking burial grounds for expanding Muslim population

first_imgThe man, who came to Japan 32 years ago, is married to a Japanese woman with whom he has two children and has no plans of leaving the country.As there is a belief in the resurrection of the dead, Islam dictates that believers be buried because the soul needs to return to the physical body, according to the Japan Muslim Association.According to the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, the central government has not set regulations for burials and leaves municipalities to establish their own rules on issues such as the distance of sites from residential areas and rivers. As of fiscal 2018, over 99 percent of bodies in Japan were cremated.According to the Japan Islamic Trust, Japan has no burial sites for Muslims at all in the northeastern Tohoku region or west of the Chugoku region. Despite a rise in the number of foreign residents in Japan who practice Islam, cemeteries offering burials in accordance with the Quran remain sparse, with Muslims struggling to gain understanding of the need for new sites from locals in a country where cremation is the norm.While Japan is home to an estimated 200,000 Muslims, a figure likely to grow as the country accepts more foreign workers, there are currently only seven locations for Islamic interment.”It would take money, time, and effort to get buried in my native country, and it isn’t realistic,” said a 57-year-old man from Pakistan who resides in Sapporo. “The body often must be moved to distant cemeteries, which can damage the corpse or result in high transportation fees,” said the trust’s director general, Qureshi Haroon.One of the seven sites is a regular cemetery in Hokkaido in the coastal town of Yoichi. But Yoichi Reien offers only very limited space for burials — just four to five free spaces — leaving Towfik Alam, chairman of the Hokkaido Islamic Society, “incredibly worried.”Although the society had planned to create a cemetery in Otaru that would follow Hokkaido’s protocols such as being at least 110 meters away from a residential area, the project was abandoned last summer after it failed to gain support from residents.Read also: ‘It has even changed death’: Virus disrupts burials in Turkey”Residents were worried about the hygiene of burials, among other aspects,” a city spokesperson said.Meanwhile, there are plans to build a cemetery for Muslims in Oita Prefecture, but it too has been facing pushback from locals who are worried about water pollution.Hirofumi Tanada, an honorary professor at Waseda University with extensive knowledge of Japan’s Muslim community, says accommodating the needs of practitioners of not just Islam but a range of religious traditions has become more important since Japan amended its immigration law last April to accept more foreign workers.”The problem regarding burials is just one example,” he said.Topics :last_img read more

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Gold Coast mansion listing price slashed by $4 million

first_imgLandscaped gardens feature throughout. The view of the Broadwater.As if there isn’t enough room to move already, an enormous vacant block of lawn adjoins the house. “It would suit a variety of people as you can close off levels and use the lift,” Ms Uhrhane said. “I would dearly love to see it go to a family who appreciates and enjoys it.” Courtney Scott of Ray White Sovereign Islands is currently marketing the property. The house has been custom designed.Its extensive list of luxurious features includes a 10-car garage, Kone commercial lift, smart wiring, a hi-tech media room, heated infinity pool, Swedish-style sauna and vast rooftop terrace. Commercial-grade bi-fold doors and windows can be opened to connect this interior space with another outdoor entertaining area, which has a built-in barbecue, kitchenette and heated pool. The kitchen even has a spectacular view. No detail is spared in the luxury property.The listing price has slowly dropped over the past 12 months and now, on the market with a different agency, it’s priced at $8 million — $8.8 million.Designed by architect David Carlson, the five-bedroom home, at 46-48 Knightsbridge Parade East, occupies two blocks of waterfront land overlooking South Stradbroke Island. 46-48 Knightsbridge Parade East, Sovereign Island is on the market at $8 million — $8.8 million.A PALATIAL Gold Coast mansion has had its listing price slashed by $4 million in a renewed marketing push.The Sovereign Islands property on two blocks of land on Knightsbridge Parade East was on the market last year at $12 million. What a view!More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North2 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa22 hours agoWhen vendors Nina and Dennis Uhrhane created their five-level mansion, the couple considered every single detail.“I love the property as it’s just a lovely home that’s easy for entertaining,” Ms Uhrhane said. “There’s so much room and it has everything you need, which makes it easy to live in.” last_img read more

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