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The art of sloganeering How many ways can politicians say change

first_imgOTTAWA — Change. Forward. Together. For you.They are the buzzwords of political campaigns worldwide, used time and again in various combinations, to sum up a campaign theme in few enough letters to fit on a podium sign.On Tuesday, the NDP became the fifth and final major party to unveil its campaign catchphrase, hoping “In it for You” will catch voters’ attention.Dennis Matthews, a vice-president at Enterprise Canada who worked in the message mines as an advertising and marketing adviser to prime minister Stephen Harper, said “a ton of effort” goes into finding a phrase that can sum up an entire campaign in one short and snappy sentence.“A campaign will do all kinds of research, look at all of their potential voters and what they’re looking for,” he said. “In a campaign you want to imagine the voter going into the voter booth and asking themselves a question. A good slogan sets up that question so they can only pick you as the only option.”The NDP’s new slogan points, without being negative, to the idea that the NDP are there to help the little guy while the Liberals and Tories are in it for themselves and their wealthy friends.It’s similar both to the slogan the federal Liberals used in 2008, “Always Here for You,” and to the Conservatives’ current “It’s Time for You to Get Ahead.”Such echoes are not uncommon, said Matthews, because “campaigns are referendums on the future.”“Voters are looking forward so most campaign slogans at least hint at a forward-looking or action-oriented thesis and there are only so many words that fit that.”“Forward together” was one of Winston Churchill’s most common speech slogans throughout his political career. It has been used by two of his successors as British prime minister — Margaret Thatcher in 1980 and Theresa May in 2017 — and at least two American presidential candidates. Richard Nixon used it in his inauguration speech in 1969 and Hillary Clinton turned to it for her presidential run in 2016.In 2019, the Green Party of Canada is building on it for its slogan: “Not Left. Not Right. Forward Together.”The Liberals have dropped the “together” part and are just going with “Choose Forward” in 2019. It’s remarkably similar to the 2004 Liberal theme phrase of “Moving Forward.”The Bloc Quebecois is using “Le Quebec, c’est nous” — roughly, “We are Quebec.”In 1980, Ronald Reagan’s slogan in his first successful presidential campaign was “Let’s Make America Great Again.” Twenty-six years later, Donald Trump tweaked it into one of the best-known political slogans in history. “Make America Great Again” hats and T-shirts are still common (Trump now has to decide whether he can still use it after four years in office).In 2015, in an election campaign almost entirely about voter fatigue with a decade-old Conservative government, both the Liberals and NDP went with “change”: “Real Change” for the Liberals and “Ready for Change” for the NDP.Scott Reid, who was a communications adviser to prime minister Paul Martin and is now a principal at the strategy firm Feschuk.Reid, said most slogans are developed as part of an intensive and lengthy research process to suss out a potential path to electoral victory. Polls and focus groups and voter outreach guide “a whole slew of decisions” including advertising spots and which public issues a campaign will prioritize.“The slogan itself emerges from that,” he said.As for the actual words? “I don’t believe they matter very much,” said Reid.Few, if any, campaigns are lost on bad slogans and most slogans end up on the floor as soon as the last vote is counted. Some of the best aren’t even official slogans at all.In 2011 “a strong, stable, national Conservative majority government” wasn’t the official Conservative campaign slogan but became the recognizable theme for a campaign appealing to voters tired of fragile minority governments.Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign added “Yes we can” to the political-slogan hall of fame, but his official slogan was actually “Change We Can Believe In.” “Yes We Can” was a holdover from Obama’s previous Senate campaign, a catchphrase he used in speeches, that took off as a rallying cry for his supporters.As proof that slogans aren’t everything, one need only know that the Green Party of Canada also used “Yes We Can” for its 2006 election effort. That netted the party zero seats and less than five per cent of the vote.Trudeau’s 2015 campaign is remembered for promising “sunny ways” even though Trudeau didn’t talk about sunny ways — borrowed from Wilfrid Laurier — until his victory speech on voting day.Matthews said as in any advertising, the best slogans can’t always be predicted.“Some of this stuff, you’ve got to put it out there and see if it catches on,” he said. “In the marketing world you can be a little lucky and land on something that really catches on. Sometimes it doesn’t.”Mia Rabson, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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BC threatens to sue Alberta as all sides in Trans Mountain dispute

first_imgVICTORIA – All sides in the escalating dispute over the Trans Mountain expansion project appear to be digging in with the Alberta and British Columbia governments clashing over fuel prices and Indigenous and political leaders warning of civil unrestTensions escalated Monday with B.C. Attorney General David Eby threatening to sue Alberta over legislation it introduced to restrict the flow of oil, gasoline and natural gas leaving that province, which could boost fuel prices in B.C.“The immediate recourse that’s available to us is to potentially sue the Alberta government for an unconstitutional piece of legislation,” he said.Eby said he can’t predict gasoline prices — now at about $1.50 per litre in Metro Vancouver — but “what I can say is any concern British Columbians have that a bill that preferentially punishes B.C. from the Alberta perspective and tries to drive up gas prices would be unconstitutional and we would take action immediately to address that.”Alberta Premier Rachel Notley said the legislation sends the message that Alberta is prepared to defend its resources.It would direct pipeline companies, truckers and rail operators on how much oil product they ship and when. Violators would face fines of up to $1 million a day for individuals and $10 million a day for corporations.The legislation is the latest manoeuvre in the ongoing dispute over the pipeline project that has the federal and Alberta governments supporting the pipeline expansion project, while B.C. opposes it, saying it is defending its coast from a potentially catastrophic spill.The federal government approved the 1,700-kilometre pipeline expansion project starting near Edmonton and ending in Burnaby, B.C., in November 2016, saying the pipeline is in the national interest. Alberta said the $7.4-billion pipeline to the West Coast gives the province access to overseas markets.But the B.C. government says the expansion and seven-fold increase in oil tanker traffic in coastal waters poses environmental and economic risks that are too great. The province is preparing to ask the courts to determine who has jurisdiction over the pipeline in the province.Kinder Morgan announced earlier this month it is pulling back on spending for the project and gave Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government until May 31 to give a clear signal the project will proceed.Trudeau, Notley and B.C. Premier John Horgan met Sunday in Ottawa to discuss the pipeline, but emerged from the meeting deadlocked. Trudeau repeated the federal government’s commitment to ensuring the project’s completion and announced his government was preparing to hold private, financial talks with Kinder Morgan.Indigenous leaders, who were not invited to the meeting in Ottawa, joined together with representatives of the cities of Vancouver and Burnaby on Monday to redouble their opposition to the pipeline.Stewart Phillip, the grand chief of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, said opposition is broad-based and entrenched.“It’s a stinker of an idea. It’s a stinker of a proposal and it will be defeated,” he said.Phillip said resistance to Trans Mountain isn’t just from Indigenous Peoples, but people of all backgrounds from across Canada.So far, about 200 people have been arrested at protests near the pipeline terminal site in Burnaby.Burnaby Mayor Derek Corrigan said he expected civil disobedience against the pipeline to continue to grow.He said he’s embarrassed Canada’s prime minister and the Alberta premier are kowtowing to an American multinational oil company.“I think if people totally lose faith in our democratic system, if they believe that the federal government has been able to impose its will, that they’ve ignored the court proceedings, then I think we’re looking for chaos,” said Corrigan. “And that’s what worries me.”B.C.’s prosecution service announced Monday it would consider criminal contempt of court charges against protesters alleged to have broken a court injunction while demonstrating near the pipeline construction site.The service also said it had appointed a special prosecutor in the cases of Green party Leader Elizabeth May and New Democrat MP Kennedy Stewart, both arrested at the site.— With files from Gemma Karstens-Smith.last_img read more

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The need of the hour

first_imgDevelopment, progress and economic growth of the society and country is proportional to the participation of the workforce in these activities. The health of people is, therefore, of utmost importance. Only a disease free healthy person can contribute effectively to the process of advancement. Unfortunately, India accounts for a relatively large share of the world’s disease burden and there is an epidemiological transition from the communicable diseases to non-communicable diseases in the total disease burden of the country. It is thus important to review the national health profile. The National Sample Survey Office (NSSO), the 71st round report on ‘Health in India’, has brought out certain facts which are of serious concern. Also Read – A special kind of bondAbout 9 per cent of rural population and 12 per cent of urban population reported ailment during a 15 day reference period. This means nearly 13 crore people in the country are unwell at any time. Proportion (no. per 1000) of ailing person (PAP) was highest for the age group of 60 & above (276 in rural, 362 in urban) followed by that among children (103 in rural, 114 in urban). About 4.4 per cent of the urban population was hospitalised (excluding childbirth) any time during a reference period of 365 days. The proportion of persons hospitalised in the rural areas was lower (3.5 per cent). This means about 6 crore people need hospitalisation. Also Read – Insider threat managementBoth in rural and urban areas highest proportion (around 25 per cent) for hospitalisation (excluding childbirth) were reported for ‘Infection’ (inclusive of all types of fever, jaundice, tuberculosis, tetanus, diarrhoea/dysentery and other infection). About 60 per cent people took treatment without any medical advice. This was primarily attributed to ‘financial constraints’ (57 per cent in rural, 68 per cent in urban). Out of the total medical expenditure, around 72 per cent in rural and 68 per cent in urban areas was made for purchasing ‘medicine’ for non-hospitalised treatment. In a recent report of India Council of Medical Research (ICMR), titled India: Health of the Nation’s States: The India State-Level Disease Burden Initiative(2017), it is observed that the disease burden due to communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional diseases, as measured using Disability-adjusted life years(DALYs), dropped from 61 per cent to 33 per cent between 1990 and 2016. In the same period, disease burden from non-communicable diseases increased from 30 per cent to 55 per cent. The epidemiological transition, however, varies widely among Indian states: 48 per cent to 75 per cent for non-communicable diseases, 14 per cent to 43 per cent for infectious and associated diseases, and 9 per cent to 14 per cent for injuries. The cost of treatment has been on the rise in India and it has led to inequity in access to health care services. India spends only 1.02 per cent of its GDP (2015-16) as public expenditure on health. Per capita public expenditure on health in nominal terms has gone up from Rs 621 in 2009-10 to Rs 1112 in 2015-16. The Centre: State share in total public expenditure on health was 31:69 in 2015-16. The share of Centre in total public expenditure on health has been declining steadily over the years. As high as 86 per cent of rural population and 82 per cent of urban population were not covered under any scheme of health expenditure support. Rural households primarily depended on their ‘household income/savings’ (68 per cent) and on ‘borrowings’ (25 per cent), the urban households relied much more on their ‘income/saving’ (75 per cent) for financing expenditure on hospitalisation, than on ‘borrowings’ (only 18 per cent). The country strives towards achieving Universal Health Coverage. But till date, it has been a piecemeal approach. What we need is a comprehensive state-controlled healthcare assurance, not insurance. The Ayshman Bharat talks of insurance without keeping in view the health determinants like nutrition, housing, wages, purchasing capacity, clean drinking water, sewage facilities and job security. Moreover, it covers less than 40 per cent population that too for inpatient care. From the NSSO data, it is clear that major expenditure is on outpatient care and in purchasing medicines. It is still not clear as to who are the 50 crore people covered in the scheme and who will add their names in the list of beneficiaries. Many people resent that they are not able to find their names in the scheme. Moreover, the rest about 80 crore people who are left out are not rich. There are no special schemes for senior citizens who form the largest number of ailing persons. Primary care which forms the basis of a healthy society has no mention. The whole scheme is for inpatient care. It will not help reduce the catastrophic health expenditure on health by the households. There is a need to study the health profile from the perspective of universal healthcare. Fear is that the scheme may end up giving doles to the insurance companies. (Dr. Arun Mitra is Vice President, Indian Doctors for Peace and Development. Views are strictly personal)last_img read more

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Modi afraid because time for him to go has arrived Rahul Gandhi

first_imgNew Delhi: Taking a swipe at Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Congress President Rahul Gandhi Wednesday said his expression during his address to the nation betrayed his anxiety that “his time to go has come”. Addressing a convention of the party’s Other Backward Classes (OBC) department, Gandhi said the prime minister has realised that the Congress will now give justice to the poor. His reference was to the newly-announced NYAY (minimum income guarantee scheme) whereby the party promises to give Rs 72,000 per year to five crore poor families in the country to bring them out of poverty. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ The Congress president also assured the OBC community that they would see many more MPs and MLAs from among them as the Congress had earlier given two OBC chief ministers to the country. “He (PM) made the country wait for 45 minutes for his announcement, did you look at his face? He has realised that the Congress will now give justice…Modi is now afraid that his time to go has come,” he told the gathering at the Indira Gandhi Indoor Stadium here, ahead of the April-May parliamentary election. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K In an unprecedented broadcast to the nation on television, radio and social media, Modi on Wednesday announced that India had demonstrated anti-satellite missile capability by shooting down a live satellite, describing it as a rare achievement that puts the country in an exclusive club of space superpowers. Attacking the prime minister, Gandhi said he had lied about giving Rs 15 lakh to people in the run-up to the 2014 election, but the Congress would give Rs 72,000 as part of the proposed income guarantee scheme. “We won’t be able to give Rs 15 lakh, but we won’t lie. We will give Rs 3.60 lakh crore in the bank accounts of the poor,” he said. “What we say, we do. I am guaranteeing your community (OBCs) that in the coming days, the Congress will give you space. Today you see two OBC CMs, you will see much more OBC MPs, MLAs,” he said. “We have written in our manifesto that any youth, be it from any category, doesn’t need any permission for the first three years for starting a business…We want make in India, not made by Ambani…we want make in India, not made by Ambani in France,” he said. Gandhi has been alleging that businessman Anil Ambani has benefitted from the Rafale deal with French defence firm Dassault, an allegation denied by the industrialist and the government.last_img read more

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Mens basketball Ohio State 2017 target Mark Smith commits to Illinois

Days after taking an official visit to Ohio State, class of 2017 four-star guard Mark Smith officially committed on Wednesday to play for Illinois and coach Brad Underwood.The Edwardsville, Illinois, native chose Illinois over other offers from Ohio State, Michigan State and Kentucky. Smith had recently been named Mr. Illinois Basketball, an honor previously given to former NBA first-round picks like Derrick Rose, Jahlil Okafor and Jabari Parker.In the last three weeks, Smith has received visits from Kentucky, Duke, Missouri and Michigan State, and has received offers from those schools in addition to Indiana, Kansas State and Nebraska among others.It had been speculated before his announcement that he would sign with either Illinois or Michigan State with 247Sports giving the Illini a 82 percent chance to land the guard and the Spartans a 18 percent chance.Smith was ranked the fourth-best prospect in the state of Illinois, 16th-best point guard and 74th-best overall prospect in the 2017 class by 247Sports composite rankings. The 6-foot-5, 225-pound point guard was also ranked the top player at his position in the midwest by Scout.com.In his senior year at Edwardsville High School, Smith averaged 21.9 points, 8.4 assists and 8.2 rebounds per game. Smith is the first shooting guard to commit to Illinois and the second four-star prospect, joining point guard Trent Frazier. read more

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Pellegrini confirms Arnautovic injury

first_imgThe West Ham United player will be out for around a month after he had a hamstring injury midweek in the game against Cardiff CityWest Ham United’s lucky charm Marko Arnautovic was injured after the 3-1 victory over Cardiff City this week.And for the Hammers’ boss Manuel Pellegrini, this is a massive blow to the squad.“We have many different players injured in many different positions, not only the professional players but also the young players [can step in] like Diangana did some months ago,” he told reporters as published by Football London.declan rice, england, West ham UnitedReport: England’s Rice gets death threats George Patchias – September 9, 2019 England International Declan Rice has received death threats.Rice a one time Ireland International, switched allegiances only this year. The West Ham United man played for…“We have other young players who are able to play in this moment.”“We know how important Marko is for our team. We have too many players injured in a month that we have to play seven games and then in January, six more games,” he explained.“But I always have the same answer, we have a squad and it is a chance for another layer to demonstrate why they are here. I was very happy with Lucas Perez the other day that he took his chance and scored two goals.”“So we must continue working with the players that are able to in this moment and that the others can recover as soon as they can,” he concluded about the topic.last_img read more

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Sterling showed maturity – Pellegrini

first_imgWest Ham manager Manuel Pellegrini has praised City winger Raheem Sterling for his handling of the alleged racist abuse directed at him during their 2-0 defeat at Chelsea.Pellegrini signed Raheem Sterling in July 2015 from Liverpool for £49m when he was the manager at Manchester City.Following Saturday incident at Stamford Bridge, Pellegrini praised the City winger for the way he handled the racial abuse.“I read some things about that. Raheem has spoken about it and now I think it is better for him to continue playing because he’s doing very well, and not have distractions about stupid things,” Pellegrini told Sky Sports.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…“All things will affect a little bit but I think now Raheem is a more mature player.“It has been two or three years since he arrived at Manchester City so I hope that he will manage the situation in the best way.“I don’t think we should continue talking about that.“[It would mean] you give too much importance to some small people that have stupid minds, so I think everyone knows that is not the way most people think.”last_img read more

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COLD CASE UNIT REVIEWS A DECADE OF CASES SEVEN MURDERS

first_img TCI Premier blasts Opposition side for “slop” information, sets it straight in HOA Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 26 2014 – The TC Weekly Newspaper is carrying an interesting report on 15 cases from recent years which remain unsolved. The list of the heinous murders and vile crimes with no one to answer for them is startling and just as revealed in the House of Assembly recently; the unit to deal with the cases has been revived. The Cold Case Unit was actually, reportedly established since 2011 by the Commissioner of Police, Colin Farquhar and now Inspector Daniel Miller will head it with a focus on cases dating back to March 2004. The article outlines that seven of the killings involved Turks and Caicos Islanders, five were Haitians, one Canadian, one Turkish man and a man from Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. All of these unsolved crimes will be re-examined … it is anticipated that as Officer Miller delves deeper into the case files, there will be details. As for recent unsolved mysteries, the Police reminded of the $40,000 reward being offered by Crime Stoppers in the shooting death of businessman, Robert Been Sr from March this year. Recommended for you Related Items:cold case unit, Colin Farquhar, house of assembly, officer miller, robert been, turks and caicos weekly news Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Budget cuts hurt, but necessary says TCI Deputy Premier in parliamentary debate on hurricane funds Minister of Works puts government buildings reconstruction post hurricanes at $8.6mlast_img read more

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7th Pay Commission Government may offer salary hikes beyond recommendations

first_img7th Pay Commission: Government may offer salary hikes beyond recommendationsCreative CommonsThe Narendra Modi led government is planning to increase the minimum pay for central government employees from Rs 18,000 to Rs 21,000 from April 2018. The center is also reportedly considering salary hikes beyond the 7th Pay Commission recommendation for the Central government staffs.The pay hike plan is expected to be approved in April this year, Financial Express reports quoting Finance Ministry officials.Here are some points you should know about salary hike under 7th Pay Commission recommendations:• Central government staff under the pay matrix level 1 to 5 will be included in the expected pay hike of Rs 18,000- Rs 21,000.• The fitment factor is expected to be hiked to 3.00 from the current 2.57 beyond the recommendations of the 7th Central Pay Commission.• Reports have indicated that the hike is expected to come into force from April and would be rolled out without arrears.• Union Cabinet on March 8 increased DA (Dearness Allowance) and DR (Dearness Relief) by two percent accordance with the accepted formula, based on the recommendations of the 7th Pay Commission.• The salary revision policy in the country will change and the government is planning not to have any more Central Pay Commissions in future. It is expected that in the new alternative system the salaries and allowances of central government employees will increase every year.In the wake of the increased cost of living and inflation, central government employees union leaders had earlier asked to raise minimum basic pay to Rs 26,000 and fitment factor 3.68 times. In June 2017, the Union Cabinet had approved the recommendations of 7th Central Pay Commission with 34 modifications based on the recommendations of the Committee on Allowances (CoA). Implementation of 7th Central Pay Commission recommendations will have a huge impact in the coming elections also. The issue matters to both pensioners and central government employees, constituting a large portion of the vote bank for the 2019 elections.However, the government is still to confirm anything officially regarding the implementation of 7th Pay Commission recommendations, leaving the government employees anxious.last_img read more

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70000 new expectant mothers among Rohingya refugees

first_imgLalmoti, a Rohingya refugee reacts in pain as she holds her one day old baby inside her temporary shelter at a camp in Cox`s Bazar, Bangladesh September 18, 2017. REUTERSBangladesh said Monday there were 70,000 pregnant and breastfeeding mothers among the wave of Rohingya refugees who have entered the country after fleeing violence from Myanmar in the past three weeks.The UN says 415,000 civilians from the Rohingya Muslim minority have arrived in Bangladesh since August 25, overwhelming refugee camps near the border that were unprepared for the sudden influx.The majority of those crossing have been women and children, with aid agencies warning of an unfolding humanitarian crisis as authorities struggle to provide basic facilities for the desperate civilians.In a briefing on the relief effort Monday, Information Minister Hasanul Haq said a huge number-roughly one in six-of the new arrivals living in the camps were expectant or new mothers.“Special care has been undertaken for 70,000 pregnant and breastfeeding mothers,” Haq told reporters.The United Nations has warned of intolerable conditions in camps around the border town of Cox’s Bazar.Haq added that roughly 16,000 toilets have been built across the sprawling camps to improve woeful sanitation standards, and check-posts erected to ensure security for those camping in open spaces.The minister ruled out a military solution to the crisis, deflecting calls from hardline Islamists for Bangladesh to defend the persecuted Muslim minority.At least 20,000 hardliners rallied in Dhaka on Monday demanding an end to the “genocide” being perpetrated against the Rohingya, a reviled minority denied citizenship inside Myanmar.“Bangladesh wants a diplomatic-not military-solution,” Haq said.The government has promised to build new camps large enough to host 400,000 refugees, but has also rehashed an old plan to turn a desolate island into a new home for the Rohingya.The existing camps are full, but Bangladesh has issued strict orders that the Rohingya do not leave designated areas, fearful that nearby cities could be swamped.Some 200 Rohingya have been sent back to the camps after relocating to nearby towns in recent days, police say.last_img

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Cardinals Face Minnesota in the First Round of the NCAA Tournament

first_img GAME 33 – FIRST ROUND NCAA TOURNAMENTDate: March 21, 2019Time: 12:15 p.m.Site: Wells Fargo Arena (14,039), Des Moines, IowaTelevision: CBS – Kevin Harlan, play-by-play; Reggie Miller & Dan Bonner, analysts; Dana Jacobson, reporter.Radio: WHAS (840 AM) Paul Rogers, play-byplay; Bob Valvano, analyst. Also: Westwood One- Kevin Kugler, play-by-play; Robbie Hummel, analyst (Sirus channel 135, XM 201, Internet 971)Series History: Tied 3-3 (0-1 in Louisville, 0-1 at Minnesota, 3-1 neutral)Last Meeting: UofL 81, Minnesota 68 (Nov. 14, 2014 at Aguadilla, Puerto Rico; 2014 Armed Forces Classic) Story Links Louisville Game Notes Minnesota Game Notes The Cardinals are very balanced on the offensive end, with four players averaging over eight points.  Sophomore Jordan Nwora leads the Cardinals in in scoring and rebounding with 17.2 points and 7.5 rebounds per game.   Dwayne Sutton ranks second on the team in scoring with 10.2 points along with 6.9  rebounds per game. Christen Cunninghamis third on the team in scoring with 9.8 points and leads the team with 156 assists on the year.  Steven Enoch averages 9.3 points per game along with 5.2 rebounds per game. LOUISVILLE, Ky. – The University of Louisville men’s basketball team will make its 39th appearance in the NCAA Tournament, facing No. 10 seed Minnesota in an East Region first round contest on Thursday, March 21, at Wells Fargo Arena in Des Moines, Iowa. Jordan Nwora is the second-most improved scorer in the nation with his 17.2 scoring average (sixth in the ACC) up 11.5 ppg from his 5.7 average last year. He has scored 20 or more points on 12 occasions this season and has eight double-doubles (two of the the last five games). His 75 three-pointers is one short of the top 10 for a single season at Louisville. Christen Cunningham was second in the ACC in assists in conference only games (6.0). He has handed out seven assists in his last game against North Carolina and had a season-best 12 assists vs. Duke on Feb. 12, the most for a Cardinal in five years. He needs five assists to reach the top 10 for a single season at UofL (156 currently). In the Cardinals’ 18 ACC games, centers Malik Williams (8.7 ppg, 6.6 rpg) and Steven Enoch (9.4 ppg, 5.3 rpg) combined to average 18.1 points and 11.9 rebounds while splitting the time at the position. Williams had his fourth double-double of the season against North Carolina in his last game on March 14, while Enoch added 12 points and three rebounds in the game. Chris Mack joins Denny Crum (26 wins in 1971-72) David Padgett (22, 2017-18) and John Dromo (21, 1967-68) as the only UofL coaches to have won 20 games in their first season with the Cardinals. Louisville has limited an opponent to under 40 percent accuracy for a half on 32 occasions, including both halves against Notre Dame on March 13. UofL is 16th in the nation in adjusted defensive efficiency. UofL has scored 80 or more points in 13 games (74.5 ppg) and the Cardinals are 29th in the nation in adjusted offensive efficiency by Kenpom. UofL was fifth in the ACC in scoring offense for conference games (71.9 ppg). UofL has faced the third-toughest schedule in the nation (sixth-toughest non-conference). UofL and Minnesota are two of four schools in the nation to have played at least 12 games against schools in the nation’s Top 25. Louisville’s 2019 signing class is ranked second in the nation by ESPN.com,Print Friendly Versioncenter_img Minnesota is ninth in the nation in free throw attempts with 808, are 21st in made free throws (549), and 34th in total rebounds (1259). Jordan Murphy is one of the nation’s best rebounders, ranking fifth in the nation averaging 11.5 per game. The 6-foot-7 forward averages 14.8 points per game and his 22 double-doubles are the second-most in the nation. Amir Coffey leads the Gophers in scoring (16.2 ppg) and leads the Big Ten in minutes played. Minnesota makes its second NCAA Tournament trip in three years.  The Gophers are making their 11th NCAA Tournament appearance overall (excluding vacated seasons of 1994, 1995 and 1997).  A No. 7 seed, Louisville has achieved a 20-13 record while facing the nation’s third-toughest schedule.  Picked to finish 11th in the ACC, UofL attained a 10-8 conference record and earned a tie for sixth in the final ACC regular season standings.  The Cardinals have beaten four Associated Press Top 25 teams this year and stand at No. 22 in the nation in the NCAA’s NET rankings. Louisville ranks among the nation’s top 30 teams in both offensive (29th) and defensive efficiency (17th). Pregame Quotes CARD FILESlast_img read more

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3D printing glass objects

first_img Journal information: Nature Citation: 3-D printing glass objects (2017, April 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-04-d-glass.html Over the past several years 3-D printing has taken off as printers have improved and prices have fallen. Objects made by such printers have become common across the globe, from research institutes to hobbyist’s garages. But despite its popularity, such printers have had one glaring weakness—an inability to print glass objects—3-D printers of today print objects made of plastics, ceramics and even metal, but not glass, which is a shame, the researchers note, because materials made of them offer many advantages such as resistance to thermal and chemical damage. And of course, they are transparent. But now, it appears that has changed, as the team in Germany has found a way to print glass objects using ordinary 3-D printers.The new technique allows for 3-D printing glass objects based on the creation of a “liquid glass” the team developed—a glass nanocomposite with glass nanoparticles suspended in a photocurable prepolymer. In practice, the sandy glass nanoparticles are mixed into a liquid solution and the results are then used as the “ink” for the printer. Once printed in the traditional way, the glass object is transferred to an oven that cures the glass and burns off other extraneous materials. The result is an object made of pure, clear glass. © 2017 Phys.org A microfluidic Tesla mixer cascade chip generated by three-dimensional printing in fused silica glass. Credit: NeptunLab/KIT Explore further A three-dimensional pretzel generated by three-dimensional printing in fused silica glass. Credit: NeptunLab/KIT More information: Frederik Kotz et al. Three-dimensional printing of transparent fused silica glass, Nature (2017). DOI: 10.1038/nature22061AbstractGlass is one of the most important high-performance materials used for scientific research, in industry and in society, mainly owing to its unmatched optical transparency, outstanding mechanical, chemical and thermal resistance as well as its thermal and electrical insulating properties. However, glasses and especially high-purity glasses such as fused silica glass are notoriously difficult to shape, requiring high-temperature melting and casting processes for macroscopic objects or hazardous chemicals for microscopic features. These drawbacks have made glasses inaccessible to modern manufacturing technologies such as three-dimensional printing (3D printing). Using a casting nanocomposite5, here we create transparent fused silica glass components using stereolithography 3D printers at resolutions of a few tens of micrometres. The process uses a photocurable silica nanocomposite that is 3D printed and converted to high-quality fused silica glass via heat treatment. The printed fused silica glass is non-porous, with the optical transparency of commercial fused silica glass, and has a smooth surface with a roughness of a few nanometres. By doping with metal salts, coloured glasses can be created. This work widens the choice of materials for 3D printing, enabling the creation of arbitrary macro- and microstructures in fused silica glass for many applications in both industry and academia. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Molten glass 3-D printer produces optically transparent glass A three-dimensional structure of a castle gate printed in fused silica glass. Credit: NeptunLab/KIT The researchers note that the size and precision of the objects printed are limited only by the precision of the printer used, just as with other 3-D printed objects. To demonstrate their new technique, the researchers printed tiny pretzels and an equally tiny castle and a honeycomb. They suggest the new technique could be used to produce both very large and very small glass objects, from skyscraper facades to tiny camera lenses. They note also that they believe that one day, most people will own a 3-D printer, and because of that, may choose to fashion their own glass objects, such as fine glassware or ornate windows. Credit: Kotz et al. Honeycomb structure printed in fused silica glass exposed to a flame of 800 °C showing the high thermal shock resistance of the printed glass part. Credit: NeptunLab/KIT (Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany has developed a way to 3-D print objects made of pure glass. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their technique and the ways they believe their new approach could be used. Karl Ziemelis, Physical, Chemical and Earth Sciences editor for Nature offers a News & Views piece on the work done by the team in the same edition. A three-dimensional pretzel generated by three-dimensional printing in fused silica glass. Credit: NeptunLab/KIT Honeycomb structure printed in fused silica glass exposed to a flame of 800 °C showing the high thermal shock resistance of the printed glass part. Credit: NeptunLab/KITlast_img read more

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Study shows babies expect fairness in resource sharing

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Explore further Most people have some feelings of fairness, both for themselves and others. If a group is presented with a resource, most expect it to be shared equally. Dividing a pie, for example, into small enough slices so that everyone gets a piece, is standard behavior. But is the feeling of fairness in our genes or is it something we learn? To learn more, the researchers enlisted the assistance of 120 babies (and parents) between the ages of 18 to 30 months—each was positioned to watch a very short puppet show.The puppet shows all started off with two puppets; one a giraffe, the other a monkey. Then, another monkey puppet entered the scene bearing a tray which held cookies. In some scenarios, there were two cookies on the tray and in others there were three. The monkey with the tray doled out the cookies as he saw fit. As the cookies were doled out, the researchers watched the faces of the baby volunteers—prior research has shown that they tend to stare longer when watching something that doesn’t correspond with how they feel something should be.In studying their data, the researchers found that when there were three cookies, the babies stared longer if the monkey doled the cookies out unfairly, such as eating all the cookies himself or if he only shared with one of the puppets. But, things changed when the monkey only brought two cookies. This time, the babies stared longer if one of the cookies was given to the giraffe, instead of the other monkey, suggesting that fairness in this case meant sharing only with those that are like you when resources are scarce.The researchers report that their results were not a surprise to them—prior research has hinted at changes in behavior in babies when unequal resources are at stake. © 2018 Phys.org A team of researchers with Stanford University and the University of Illinois has conducted a study based on testing fairness in babies and has found that they expect fairness in resource sharing, except when resources are scarce. In their paper published Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group outlines their experiments and describe their results. Credit: CC0 Public Domaincenter_img More information: Lin Bian et al. Infants expect ingroup support to override fairness when resources are limited, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2018). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1719445115 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Babies know what’s fair Citation: Study shows babies expect fairness in resource sharing (2018, February 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-babies-fairness-resource.htmllast_img read more

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Turning poetry to stone

first_imgEternal things are neither conventional nor unconventional. They are always fresh and new as truth is always fresh and relevant, believes artiste Girjesh  Singh. Singh will be displaying his work in the Capital.Singh is not concerned with temporary social causes but he looks into the internal spaces.  He lives and travels in his thoughts.  Life’s internal aspects appeal to him and its undying spirit keeps him going.  He is looking for what finally matters – a manifestation of reality, and that is why it is so individualistic.  Whenever he senses a bit of that reality, however brief, he tries to express it through his work. The brief nature of that contact is expressed in the title of his show, Often I Miss You. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Singh’s works represent his thoughts, often inspired by the great Indian mystic, Kabir. Taking inspiration from Kabir, the artiste displays his thoughts through his own, unique language.  He believes in keeping his own identity and experiencing Kabir’s philosophy through one’s own person.The medium of work inspires him first. He has chosen stone and brick – conventional and unconventional mediums for sculpture.  They are close to his heart as he grew up with these materials. Singh believes that conventionally an idea needs to be expressed in a material but unconventionally a material provides its own idea or story. Stone is a traditional medium and brick comes up as the unconventional one. He says, ‘A lot has been done in stone and it’s a challenge, but there is still some story.  When I see brick with cement I feel the brick carries its identity even when taken out of its structure’. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixHis center piece, Jhini re bini which is inspired by Kabir’s poem, where he compares life to a sheet or a covering, which is soaked in the identity of God. His work also focuses on the five elements: earth, water, air, fire and space.  The pillars have an expression of an element on the outside and on the inside, have a script with alphabets and symbols that have been inspired by various civilizations from all over the world.  At the seat of each pillar sits a lotus that shows how nature has bestowed all four elements in this one magnificent flower. He believes that the fifth element (ether, akasa or divinity as one may interpret it) cannot be understood in mere human terms; it represents, ‘The All’.Singh’s work process is way lot more than just hammers and chisels. The creative process starts with his developing his style for carving. He wanted to make a work of epic proportions on the elements which effectively showcased his philosophy. We say, don’t miss this one.WHEN: 28 January to 2 FebruaryWHERE: Visual Arts Gallery, India Habitat Centrelast_img read more

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China ups market access for foreign banks

first_imgChina has eased the rules which will provide market access for foreign banks, in a move to further open up the domestic banking sector. The Chinese Cabinet published the amended rules on Saturday, which will no longer require a specific amount of operating funds to be transferred from the parent foreign bank to its newly established Chinese branch.Previously, a foreign bank would have to unconditionally allocate at least 100 million yuan ($16.4 million) or the same value in other freely-convertible currencies. The requirement has had a restrictive impact on capital replenishing at foreign banks’ China branches.Meanwhile, direct capital injection from parent firms to their branches too would be treated as FDI, which often involved a complicated approval process from multiple government agencies, state-run Xinhua news agency reported.last_img read more

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Healthy tea gourmet jams Gifts to give with wedding invites

first_imgDitch the typical sweet boxes which are heavy and unhealthy and replace them with healthy varieties of tea, gourmet jams or gold plated idols of gods alongwith your wedding invites, experts suggest.Here are few ideas that are worth your attention:Cookies are the most comforting companions in both good and bad times. There cannot be a better treat to send out with your wedding invites. Chocolate, peanut butter, caramel, pecan to brownie, there are many variants you can take your pick from. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfGift your guests artisanal variety of chocolates which are also known as craft chocolates. These are prepared with the finest ingredients, sourced and handpicked from various parts of the country. These chocolates are available in many trendy flavours and festive packaging that is sure to leave your guests wanting for more.With the people becoming conscious about their health, gift your special guests some tea varieties. Select 4-5 varieties of teas to gift alongwith with the invitation cards. There are packages as per their preference and the size of the invite card. You can opt for the mint matcha tea, cinnamon matcha tea, turmeric tea, rose delight, Assam masala, mumbai cutting and also some lavender tea. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveCleopatra inspired ornate gold photo frame gives a touch of personalisation as people can actually put the pictures of bride and groom or a personal message from the bride and groom in the frame. It adds sentimental value and can be used as a lamp later.If you are feeling a bit more extravagant, 24 carat gold plated god figures on marble dust are the best. This is something people will never pass on and keep it at the most beautiful place at home and it will create recall value.Flavoured gourmet jams are range of premium jams available in unique flavour combinations like banana, whiskey, orange, mango, jalepeno and all handmade in small batches, from scratch, using all-natural ingredients and no preservatives or additives. Let no adulterated preserve taint your beautiful day.last_img read more

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Delhi Tourism hosts threeday winter carnival in the Capital

first_imgDelhi Tourism adds to the Christmas cheer with Winter Carnival at Dilli Haat Janakpuri, Dilli Haat Pitampura and Garden of Five Senses from December 23-25. Christmas themed ambience, shopping street and special performances are organised as a part of the event, at the three venues, offering a unique Delhi winter experience. Keeping in mind that winters are best to head out with family and friends, exploring the city, Delhi Tourism is offering an experience of the Christmas festivities as one indulges in variety of authentic and mouth watering food at the three venues.Dilli Haat Pitampura will offer unique handicrafts stalls for Christmas gifting along with various other items. On the other hand, Dilli Haat Janakpuri will host Christmas Carols and other cultural performances in the evening. Some special performances are being organised at Garden of Five Senses with artists like Kamal Gill and Maninder Mahi performing on December 25 from 3 pm to 6 pm.last_img read more

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MTGs ViaPlay service moved into Russia after its

first_imgMTG’s ViaPlay service moved into Russia after its initial launch in the Nordics.Central and eastern Europe’s online video space is rapidly evolving. Andy McDonald looks at some of the most recent developments. Away from Netflix’s heartland of the US and western Europe, central and eastern Europe’s over-the-top and video-on-demand industry is experiencing much growth and change. While premium content providers are rushing to deliver ‘TV everywhere’ services and broadcasters are looking to establish their own catch-up TV options, pay TV operators are also building out their own OTT services and are going up against new independent players in the market.But how effectively are these different solutions meeting consumers’ demands to access content as and when they want, what can they learn from existing deployments and where is the CEE market headed?The past year has seen much activity in the CEE online video sector. Recent months alone have seen Ukrainian cable operator Volia’s launch of Volia Smart HD, a hybrid cable/OTT service that will expand its reach off-net as well as providing a platform for advanced interactive services, while Amedia, one of Russia’s biggest producers of content, has launched its own premium service after securing a raft of premium western content from the likes of HBO and CBS.Elsewhere, incumbent operators like Cyfrowy Polsat, T-Hrvatski Telekom and Telekom Slovenije have broken ground with their own online services, which they have built alongside their own pay TV offerings, targeted at a slightly different user base, while pay TV providers like CME, Viasat and HBO have built a strong cross-territory following with their Voyo, Viaplay and HBO GO services respectively.Without the entrance of the big-name and big chequebook-carrying players like Netflix and Amazon’s LoveFilm, a clutch of local online-only operators have also sprung up, such as TopFun in the Czech Republic and a number of services in Russia – including the Gazprom Media-owned Now.ru and Tvigle, as well as Stream.ru and Ivi.ru.This fertile CEE video marketplace only looks likely to grow as internet and web-connected device penetration grows. According to Informa Telecoms & Media, online video accounted for only about 12% of all internet traffic in the region in 2010. However, this is tipped to jump to about 27% by 2015. The number of connected devices – including connected TVs and hybrid set-top boxes – is also due to dramatically increase from an in-home connected device install base of around 6.1 million in 2011 to just shy of 100 million by the end of 2016. Informa predicts this “will continue to fuel additional OTT-service launches”.Expanding outwardsModern Times Group-owned pay TV operator ViaSat kicked off its online efforts with the launch of Viasat OnDemand back in 2007 – a service that gradually evolved into Viaplay. Initially launching in the Nordic region, the service offers a film and TV package and a package of TV, film and sport. Last year the firm expanded the service into Russia – a move that required different rights deals to be negotiated. Starting at the end of December 2012, Viaplay’s content catalogue included recent box-office hits from Warner Bros, Sony Pictures Television, Twentieth Century Fox Television Distribution and NBCUniversal International Television Distribution. It also has rights to content from Russian studios, all for a monthly cost of RUB395 (€9.20).As in the Nordics, the Russian ViaPlay is both a standalone service for its broadband customers as well as a TV everywhere solution for Viasat premium TV subscribers. However, a further expansion into the Ukrainian market has seen the firm establish the service solely as a complimentary service for premium linear subscribers. Commenting on Viaplay’s move into the Russian market, Viaplay CEO Niclas Ekdahl says that the service is a complement to Videomore – an online video site from Russian media firm CTC Media, which is also part-owned by MTG – and is not a conflict of interests for Viasat’s parent firm.“Videomore is an advertising-funded platform where customers go and watch typically TV series and programmes that have been on CTC’s linear TV channels,” says Ekdahl. “Viaplay is a paid-for service with a subscription fee and in Russia it’s mainly movies. So it’s rather a complementary service. We also have, I wouldn’t say a firm partnership, but we have good links between the sites, so if you are on Videomore, you can then access the links into Viaplay quite easily.”Though Viaplay is subscription service, Ekdahl says he also sees a lot of potential in the CEE market for ad-funded VOD. Viasat already runs a service along these lines in the Czech Republic, which he says is having “really good traction”. In Bulgaria it runs a service called Novplay, and it has an equivalent in the Baltics where it also operates free-to-air channels.“Looking at the advertising market, there’s a lot of spending going on through the online area, and I think what we provide there is a rather safe environment where there is a lot of professional content, with high production value,” Ekdahl says. Especially compared to other sites where there can be a huge volume of “user-generated and randomised content”.Central European Media Enterprises (CME) is active in CEE in the commercial and sunscription TV space. CME operates businesses in six central and eastern European markets – Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia – across which it owns 34 TV stations. CME launched video-on-demand service Voyo in early 2011 in the Czech Republic, initially as a free offering. It has since positioned it as a pay service and expanded it across all six of its territories, with users able to access it on connected TVs, PCs, tablets and smart-phones.“CME’s strategy is ‘one content, multiple distribution’ and this says everything about the company’s approach,” says CME senior vice-president and head of Voyo Constantin Mocanu. He claims that CME’s TV presence and content delivery knowledge “makes the difference” and allows it to generate relevant content for the local audience. “Being part of the industry where research is a very important tool, traditional broadcast observes that consumers’ habits are changing quickly, the big screen is replaced by small portable screens and mobility is mandatory. We know that and we’re prepared to meet consumers and their needs wherever they are,” he says.In spite of this, Mocanu believes that there is still lots of room to grow as the CEE market becomes increasingly connected and tech-savvy. “There’s still a big category of people using smartphones only to text and call. There are still consumers who buy smart TVs only because they’re slim, without getting them online. There’s still a big lack of trust in using modern payment methods. Imagine that in Romania there are 13 million credit and debit cards in use and only 240,000 are used for internet payments,” says Mocanu. In spite of this he believes “we’re working in a fresh market with a great potential to develop.”TopFun, which has based its appeal on US content, recently launched SVOD.While CEE is widely seen as a growth market, not all signs point to a simple upwards trajectory for the players currently battling it out in the online video space. Erix Uxa, project manager at Czech Republic-based TopFun claims that the advent of digital switchover may in fact have brought with it a temporary slowdown in the VOD market, as many users are now able to access additional content, without paying for a satellite or cable subscription.“Customers are simply choosing the free digital TV service, DVB-T, which is bringing with it a little bit of lack of the interest for VOD services,” Uxa says.Dedicated online video business TopFun dates back to 2006 though the service has evolved greatly in that time, with a turning point coming in 2010 when the firm acquired content from major US studios like Universal and Warner Bros, says Uxa. Today some 80% of content sold or purchased or sold on the site is this western inventory, compared to 20% local and independent distributers’ content. With a focus on feature films, TopFun is, by Uxa’s admission, “pretty new to SVOD” having previously concentrated on a transactional business model. However, it now offers two tiers of subscription package – one costs CZK49 (?1.90) per month to access a rotating selection of 50 movies per month, the other is priced at CZK189  and offers hundreds of movies per month. Both packages are available from the web, smart TVs and smartphones.Both TVOD and SVOD have their advantages, Uxa says. Transactional allows it to carry the most up-to-date films, including Hollywood blockbusters, while SVOD appeals to a different customer – more interested in  constant access films that are less popular or not as well marketed.“TVOD sells better than SVOD and SVOD is something that generates more money in the end – so both are very important for VOD services,” says Uxa. However, he adds that “for SVOD it is always more difficult and very expensive to acquire content from major studios, so SVOD is always more likekly to include local content or independent distributers’ content, which affects the customer.”Premium contentOne firm that recently staged a major coup when it comes to acquiring top premium content for its new OTT service is Amedia. One of Russia’s biggest producers of TV and films, Amedia was founded in 2002 by Russian producer Alexander Akopov and now claims an annual production volume of more than 200 hours of content across various genres – including dramas, mysteries, thrillers, romantic comedies and sitcoms. However, for the new Amediateka.ru site, Amedia has licensed major US series, signing deals with the likes of HBO, Showtime, Fox and AMC.This online push may be seen as an extension of Amedia’s broadcast business, which began in 2011 with the launch of an Amedia-branded basic cable and satellite channel. The firm now runs two basic, and one premium, linear TV channels and Akopov says that he has big expectations for the new OTT offering – which will cost RUB229 (?5.37) per month following a first month introductory offer.“We really have big hopes, because we see the demand. There is a lot of this kind of content currently available through the pirates; we know there’s audience for our content, and we hope there will be a switch from pirated sources to legal,” says Akopov. “We have some arguments for why this might happen – because it is a clean legal service, high quality and [has] lots of additional features, like recommendations and the possibility to talk to your friends at the same time as you’re watching video.”Another factor is that with official agreements in place, Amedia is given advance copies of the US shows so that it can dub and prepare Russian-language versions that can be put live online “a minute after the US premier has finished” – another advantage over the pirates.  Though online piracy has long been a blight in Russia, Akopov believes the market may be reaching a turning point with new piracy legislation already under discussion in the Russian parliament and a broader groundswell of support among the creative industries. “I think that there is more understanding in our society of the necessity to protect intellectual property,” says Akopov. “What’s important is that the film industry is not alone, and that this time we do this all together with the music industry, with publishers and even with the internet industry which is also quite big in this country, distributing their programmes and apps legally. There’s a huge group of people who don’t want to go to piracy if the content is available legally. That was actually the main problem we had in previous years – lots of people think that they will go to the pirates because the content that they want to see is not readily available. Now we have closed a big gap with US premium content here, so there’s a completely different situation compared to what it was a year or two ago. I think that practically everything people want to watch is available legally on the net in the Russian segment of the internet.”Amedia has secured rights to a raft of US premium content for its OTT service.While there are various different players competing in the Russian market, such as Now.ru and Viaplay in the feature film business, Akopov believes that Amedia’s focus on US TV content differentiates it from its rivals. It is also a reason why it has not chosen to populate its new OTT service with its own content. “Our own content is available across various OTT services – we have them under non-exclusive licences, probably on five or six services simultaneously,” says Akopov.Indeed, the licensing and windowing of content is a major, and often tricky concern, particularly when content owners are also simultaneously trying their hand in the OTT space. BBC Worldwide is a case in point. The BBC’s commercial division launched its Global iPlayer initiative in 2011 as a way to take the ‘best of British’ content to European fans – both drawn from the BBC’s archive and independently produced content that BBC Worldwide distributes. The service is now live in 16 markets – 14 in western Europe, plus Canada and Australia.Discussing BBC Worldwide’s digital footprint, Linda Passey, head of digital, CEMA says that selling content into CEE and taking advantage of the OTT players now in this market is a difficult balancing act. “We have a very wide range of interests, so the way that we operate would be extremely different from how the studios operate. I think they have very clear and very structured windowing in each territory, but we have such a diverse catalogue and wide range of interests – for example we have our own channels, we license to pay TV platforms, over-the top services and are also thinking about our own direct-to-consumer platforms. So we don’t really have a one-sized fits all, which I think works really well for us.”One thing that is clear is that the potential for OTT is growing. According to Informa Telecoms and Media, OTT video subscription revenues in Eastern Europe are due to climb from virtually nothing in 2011 to US$297 million (€223 million) in 2017. Transactional revenues are tipped to rise from US$2 million to US$71 million in the same timeframe.Difficult environmentCME’s Mocanu says that though the region’s new OTT players are “struggling like everyone else in a difficult macro environment”, the good news is “that competition in the OTT area is still underdeveloped and content acquisition prices are still somewhat friendly. Western countries have a different trend in developing new technical achievements, things have been done naturally, in time. Meanwhile, in eastern and central Europe the speed is different, we’re ‘burning’ many stages,” he adds, saying Europe is already making a “giant leap” to OTT.Ekdahl won’t reveal Viasat’s future plans for Viaplay, but admits that “we will probably not stop at the Nordics, Russia and the Ukraine.” And others are likely to be thinking along the same lines. Though Netlfix’s next anticipated European launch is unlikely to be in CEE, there is no reason to suggest that in time it won’t be in its sights as it aims to fulfil its stated ambition – to establish itself as a global company. Other major companies operating in western Europe also seem well placed to push East – for instance Amazon-owned LoveFilm or Germany’s Maxdome. Watch this space.last_img read more

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Four legal experts have told peers of their seriou

first_imgFour legal experts have told peers of their serious concerns about the government’s commitment to enforcing disabled people’s rights through the Equality Act.Senior representatives of the Bar Council, the Law Society, the Discrimination Law Association (DLA) and the Law Centres Network were giving evidence to the Equality Act 2010 and disability committee, set up by the House of Lords to examine the act’s impact on disabled people.Lucy Scott-Moncrieff, of the Law Society, said there was a “lack of leadership” in the government and elsewhere and a “lack of commitment” to making the Equality Act work.She said the Law Society wanted the committee to consider how to restore the “transformative” and “radical” approach – based on the social model of disability – brought in through the Disability Discrimination Act in 1995.She said the Law Society wanted to see the government incorporate the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities into domestic law, which would be “a helpful indicator of that commitment and would make a practical difference to enforcement of the Equality Act” and give it “teeth”.The committee heard that claims made to employment tribunals had fallen by 70 per cent since the coalition introduced fees in 2013, while claims of disability discrimination to these tribunals had fallen from 7,492 in 2012-13 to 3,090 in 2014-15.Members of the panel agreed that employers were now more likely to think they could get away with discriminating against employees, while disabled employees were less likely to take cases against employers because of the cost of a tribunal.Barbara Cohen, giving evidence on behalf of the DLA, told members of the committee, including disabled peers Baroness [Jane] Campbell, Baroness [Sal] Brinton and Baroness [Celia] Thomas: “Employers do not have the same imperative to ensure they are operating a discrimination-free workplace.”Rachel Crasnow QC, giving evidence on behalf of the Bar Council, said the introduction of fees and the subsequent drop in claims had had a “significant chilling effect” on access to justice for poorer members of society.She said: “We are very concerned at the impact that has had on all individuals who wish to make claims and in particular the most vulnerable litigants, often those with disabilities.”She said that employers tended now to have a “far more bullish approach” to reaching an agreement with an employee taking a discrimination case during the conciliation process.She said: “There are far fewer claims being brought and that has a huge impact on industrial relations as a whole and on how workplace policies are updated and renewed.”Douglas Johnson, of the Law Centres Network, said the Equality Act was generally “fine”, but the key problems were with its enforcement.He said law centres had lost out through cuts to legal aid, but also through cuts to grants previously made by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC).Those grants had only been introduced by EHRC because there were “so few cases being brought in goods and services that it was quite clear that the Disability Discrimination Act was simply not being enforced in those areas”.He said: “There is practically no funding now for advice on discrimination law and people are all at sea on this.”He added: “There are precious few law firms around the country that will go anywhere near a discrimination case.“It is simply not cost-effective for most firms of solicitors to take that risk.”Crasnow said: “We think an enormous number of disabled people have no idea that the obstacles that they come across on a daily basis, whether it is to do with accessibility or charges, or a whole range of matters in their local communities, are simply unlawful.“And the question of how to educate both the providers of goods and services and the individuals themselves is a really key concern for us.”The panel were also critical of EHRC for repeatedly failing to use its statutory powers to enforce the Equality Act.Cohen said DLA was “particularly disappointed that the EHRC has been so reluctant to use its statutory enforcement powers” against organisations that have been discriminating against disabled people and other protected groups.She said the commission had only recently embarked on its first statutory investigation in eight years of operation, and had “far too often chosen not to use its unique position to engage in public discussions” when disability discrimination had been exposed.She said: “Issues come and go. We have listened, we looked for and we do not hear the EHRC helping us to understand that there are some real issues there.“It is not carrying out what we think is a fundamental educational role.”And Crasnow was critical of EHRC for usually only funding legal actions by “intervening” at the later appeal stage, rather than playing a role in important cases “lower down”.last_img read more

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Three disabled entrepreneurs have told MPs that th

first_imgThree disabled entrepreneurs have told MPs that the government should make it easier for people with impairments to move into self-employment.Jane Cordell, Sara McKee and Robert Winstanley were giving evidence to an inquiry by the Commons work and pensions select committee into whether the social security system adequately supports the growing number of people who are self-employed and work in the “gig economy”.McKee (pictured, giving evidence to the committee), who founded the older people’s lifestyle organisation Evermore, said she believed that making self-employment easier for disabled people could help the government with its aim to halve the disability employment gap.She said: “People want choice and control over how they live their lives. You can’t always do your best work in some organisations and institutions.“I earn currently probably a tenth of what I could earn, but my quality of life is better.”Cordell, a director of the social enterprise Result CIC, which provides coaching and training to marginalised and excluded people, said she had chosen self-employment after being discriminated against by two previous employers, including the Foreign Office.She said she had been forced to make many “sideways moves” in her career because of being deaf, and eventually decided that self-employment would provide “greater autonomy and self-respect”.But she added: “It’s a high-risk strategy because of the massive decline in income. I think it was an 80 per cent decline in the first year.”McKee, who has a mental health condition, said it was easier for her to run her own business than to sit in a job interview and admit that she might be forced to take days off sick because of being unable to get out of bed.She said she believed there needed to be a “safety net” so that disabled people like herself with fluctuating conditions could “come in and out of the workplace”.She said: “At the moment there is no safety net. If I can’t go and do what I’m good at, there is no safety net. That loses an awful lot of talent from the marketplace.”Cordell and Winstanley both pointed to flaws in the government’s Access to Work (AtW) scheme.Winstanley, who runs his own business alongside having a part-time job, said it had taken 18 months to put his AtW package in place, but after just 12 months he was told by AtW that his business should now be sustainable so he should be able to fund his own support.Cordell said she believed the government should secure the data that would demonstrate the value of AtW spending.She said she will eventually face a cut in the support she receives because of the government’s decision to cap high-value AtW packages.She said: “I want to know why and how my ability to contribute may be capped, and my ability to be one of the few senior deaf role models, inspiring others.”She said that self-employment was “a fantastic route if you have the right determination, confidence and experience, but particularly if you have a sensory impairment or quite significant impairment you need to feel you have a fighting chance of getting the right support”.Winstanley told the committee about flaws in the employment and support allowance (ESA) system, for those on out-of-work disability benefits.Because of his condition, brittle bones, he never knows when he might be seriously injured and need to spend eight or nine months in bed recovering.But if a disabled person leaves ESA to return to work, they have just 12 weeks to see if they can manage in employment, he said.He told the committee: “After that 12 weeks, you have to go back through the process.”This limit caused him problems because when he became injured and had to leave work, he had to restart the ESA application process from the beginning.He said the ESA system was too “black and white”, and added: “You either are [eligible for ESA] or you’re not. There is no form of middle ground.”last_img read more

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