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Labor Department Sends Out 90K Emails To Uncertified Unemployment Beneficiaries

first_imgImage by labor.ny.gov.ALBANY — The New York Department of Labor wants to ensure every New Yorker who filed for unemployment benefits is keeping up with their weekly certifications.This means if you do not certify that you are still unemployed each week you will not get paid your unemployment benefits.The Department of Labor said over the weekend that 90,000 people who were eligible for unemployment payments did not certify, and therefore, did not get paid.If you’re not sure if you are certified, check for an e-mail or a letter from the Department of Labor. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Five Groundhog Day Movie Moments We Want to See Musicalized

first_img PHIL’S MISERABLE WEATHER FORECAST Once it’s become clear to Phil that he’s living in a Groundhog Day time warp, he gets a teeny bit jaded, which is the perfect time for a rebellious punk-rock tune (punk-rock for Broadway, anyway) in the style of Spring Awakening’s “Totally F*cked.” Also, it’s a great excuse for Phil to curse and smash things. Sing it with us! “Blah-blah-blah-blah-blah-blah-blah-blah, blah-blah-blah-blah-blah…” PHIL’S SERENADE Once Phil stops trying to convince Rita (Andie MacDowell) he’s a good guy and starts actually being a good guy, everything changes. He’s smooth, he’s friendly, he can play the piano, this dude has everything. It’s the perfect time for a sweeping, romantic showstopper a la West Side Story. “Phil Connors… I just met a guy named Phil Connors…”  EVERY NED RYERSON SCENE No Groundhog Day musical would be complete without a giant dance extravaganza led by our favorite life insurance salesman, Ned “the Head” Ryerson. (Am I right? Or am I right, or am I right?) We propose a little ditty called “Watch Out For That First Step (It’s a Doozy),” sung by Ned and a bunch of perky Punxsutawney townsfolk in tap shoes, splashing around in icy sludge puddles a la Singing in the Rain. Bing! “I’M A GOD (NOT THE GOD)” Shows about God do great on Broadway (The Book of Mormon, anyone?) so when Phil gets the epiphany that he’s a god (not the God, a god), we suggest a big, flashy gospel number. The diner patrons could put on glittering choir robes, jump up on the counter and sing Hallelujah. (Broadway fun fact: scroll to 1:09 for a quick Michael Shannon cameo. Yep, that’s him!)  In honor of the only official holiday named after a rodent, we’d like to remind you that there is, right this very minute, a Groundhog Day musical being created by Matilda composer Tim Minchin. Based on the awesome Bill Murray comedy of the same name, the new musical has the potential to be equally great—as long as it nails a few key moments in the story. Pour yourself a sweet vermouth on the rocks with a twist and let’s dissect the top five scenes we can’t wait to see on stage. THE GROUNDHOG HEIST When Phil the Groundhog goes on a joyride, he’s gotta be played by a puppet. Let’s get some of the Avenue Q creators on board (almost-EGOT winner Bobby Lopez, we’re looking at you) to help Minchin write an irreverent Phil-and-Phil duet. And if they want to get really fancy, the actor who plays Phil could man the groundhog puppet and do a duet with himself—hear that, Tony voters? View Commentslast_img read more

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National 4-H Week

first_imgGeorgia 4-H empowers youth become self-directing, productive and contributing members of society by establishing personal and sincere relationships, learning life and leadership skills and enhancing community awareness. During National 4-H Week, Oct. 4-10, Georgians will celebrate all the exceptional things these 4-H’ers accomplish.Georgia 4-H programming, part of University of Georgia Cooperative Extension, is based on research from UGA’s colleges and other land-grant universities. Georgia has one of the largest state 4-H programs in the country, consisting of more than 242,000 active 4-H participants this year.Georgia 4-H traces its roots to 1904, when Newton County school superintendent G.C. Adams organized a corn club for boys. Today, Georgia 4-H attracts students from all areas of interest, not just those interested in agriculture. The majority of participants currently come from small cities, towns and rural non-farms.The theme for this year’s National 4-H Week, Opportunity4All, is a campaign created by the National 4-H Council to rally support for Extension’s 4-H program and identify solutions to eliminate the opportunity gap that affects 55 million kids across America.With so many children struggling to reach their full potential, 4-H believes that young people, in partnership with adults, can play a key role in creating a more promising and equitable future for youth, families and communities across the country. In 4-H, organizers believe that every child should have an equal opportunity to succeed along with the skills they need to make a difference in the world. “The idea of bringing UGA research and resources to Georgia students through the use of county Extension agents throughout the state was a cutting-edge idea over a century ago and remains a vital system today,” said Arch Smith, state 4-H leader. “The most important work of 4-H is to help young people become better citizens and enable them to grow into responsible, active adults.”Georgia 4-H youth perform community service, conduct research, compile portfolios of their accomplishments, and learn public speaking skills through oral presentations during 4-H Project Achievement. During the 2019-20 school year, more than 16,000 Georgia 4-H’ers participated in Project Achievement on the local level. Some Project Achievement winners received Master 4-H status and/or continue on to represent Georgia on a national level.For more information, visit georgia4h.org or contact your local Extension office by visiting extension.uga.edu/county-offices.last_img read more

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Teacher inspires students, and probably everyone who watches this.

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Some of you might have seen this. It made some noise when it debuted on the New York Times website some time ago.For those that haven’t seen it, it’s a nice investment of time. Inspirational on several levels, and something you’ll probably want to pass around.last_img

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Branding is about DNA, not smiles and dogs

first_imgDogs. Smiles. Fun. That’s the theme of too many credit union brands.A brand is not a logo. A brand is not a color palette.  A brand is not a dog.Yet, an online search for credit unions with dogs or credit unions with smiles yields plenty of promotions based on smiles and/or canine friends.Don’t blame the credit unions. Blame the ad agencies that confuse a promotion for a brand, agencies that talk instead of listen. These agencies trot out the same dog and pony show and then tweak that show slightly for each credit union. But dogs and smiles won’t separate your credit union from the pack.Raoust+Partners knows that each credit union has a unique DNA. That DNA has nothing to do with dogs and everything to do with each credit union’s history, culture, community, employees and members. To create an authentic brand, Raoust+Partners doesn’t field test a dozen ideas to see what sticks. What it does is plenty of research–the kind that traditional focus groups and boring surveys don’t reveal. What it does is listen… No dogs either—unless the credit union is in an area with a strong canine heritage.Instead, Raoust+Partners uncovers the credit union’s unique DNA and then builds on the core values of the past to move to a successful future. At Jeanne D’Arc Credit Union in Lowell, Mass., that DNA included a long history of reaching out to immigrants and the unbanked.In 2009 when Raoust+Partners began working with Jeanne D’Arc, the nearly 100-year-old credit union was losing both members and market share. The listening approach yielded key intelligence.Members and even former members felt a strong loyalty. But they thought of the credit union as they might a beloved former kindergarten teacher — a teacher you reluctantly leave behind after mastering the basics.“The depth of their passion for the credit union was refreshing,” president and CEO Mark Cochran says. “But they thought they should grow up and go somewhere else later. They didn’t understand that there was more.”Cochran, who had started at the credit union in 2007, knew he didn’t want to approach branding as a popularity contest.“We didn’t want the coolest thing or even ‘This is who we want to be,’” he says. “With Raoust+Partners, our approach was ‘What are we? Who are we?’ We didn’t want to project ourselves as anything different from who we are. We didn’t go about trying to invent something new. We wanted to use our members’ words and perceptions as a launching point for where we want to go in the future.”As Cochran listened to members, former members and employees, he heard stories of how the credit union had made a difference and how strongly the community and the credit union were intertwined.“So many of these stories had a common theme: ‘I was new to this country,’” Cochran says. “The credit union was the first place that I had an account. It was the first place I got a car loan.’ But they viewed us like a hometown savings and loan — offering only checking, savings and mortgages.”Jeanne D’Arc was already offering the products members wanted—credit cards, small business loans, automated banking –members just didn’t know. But getting the word out about those products was a minor part of the Raoust+Partners strategy. Emphasizing connections was the major focus.At Jeanne D’Arc employees are part of the community and many know the members personally or at least at the level of  ‘I know your cousin who dated my sister.’ That shared history, knowledge and understanding make up the edge the competition doesn’t have. With that in mind, most of the marketing and advertising Raoust+Partners developed was based not on products but on the connection. With an authentic brand, employees don’t have to put on fake smiles and read from a phony script—they live the brand.To reflect that shared history and values, Raoust+Partners created “We share a common thread.”The resulting brand is a big mirror that accurately reflects members, employees, the community and the credit union’s personality. When members or perspective members look in that mirror, they recognize something that makes them feel comfortable and at home. They feel the connection.That connection can happen only with a brand that is true to the credit union. An authentic brand reflects a credit union so closely that it would fail anywhere else. Raoust+Partners knows what works in Lowell, Mass., won’t work in Panama City, Fla.  At Innovations Credit Union in Panama City the resulting brand position was “Spark Change” based on the young credit union’s modern, progressive outlook.Meantime since 2009, Jeanne D’Arc’s assets have nearly doubled, from $600 million to $1.1 billion—all organic growth, no mergers. The average age of members has dropped from 46 to 41. Average age of new members is 34“It was the natural outcome of doing things that are right for our members,” Cochran says. “It goes back to that common thread.”And an uncommon approach.Woof. 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Olivier Raoust Olivier Raoust is the founder and creative force behind Raoust+Partners, a brand consultancy that has worked with almost 40 credit unions over the past 20 years. Passionate about credit … Web: www.meetyourstorytellers.com Detailslast_img read more

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Seven steps for smarter electronic channels

first_imgMembers are increasingly dependent on electronic channels to research financial topics and conduct transactions.And savvy credit unions know it’s critical to leverage the time members spend on their screens to drive deeper relationships and increase sales.These seven steps can help you do both.1. Make good use of your home pageAlthough topic-specific search can give visitors a “side door” into your site, the home page is still considered prime real estate. Deliver effective navigation and design that takes advantage of the space offered by today’s larger monitors.For example, ensure your home page supports the top tasks that your customers perform on your site. Customers come to a site to complete tasks. They have a low tolerance for searching for what they want to do. continue reading » 28SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Preparing your credit union for the Coronavirus

first_img continue reading » The Coronavirus continues to spread rapidly through China, and it’s difficult to find accurate numbers of its victims. Although most China and most countries have done a good job of containing the virus within borders, all borders are porous. As it grows, the chance that it might sweep other countries increases.Currently, the Coronavirus poses a minimal threat to credit union operations. Nevertheless, that could change quickly. And if it does, preparation could mean the difference between smooth business continuity and disaster.So, now’s the time to review your credit union’s business continuity and disaster recovery plans. Even if this virus doesn’t affect North America, your BCP and DR plans could probably use a little touch-up for pandemics.(Plus, any opportunity to better serve your members while strengthening compliance is a sure win.) ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Key witness for Giuliani’s Four Seasons total humiliation press conference is convicted sex offender

first_imgWhen you’re done laughing, consider donating $7 to be split among seven organizations in Georgia building critical progress infrastructure to keep Georgia blue. Brooks ran for Congress in 2004 as the Green Party candidate in New Jersey’s 12th District, along with a slew of other campaign runs since as a libertarian and Poor People’s Campaign candidate. At the Four Seasons Total Humiliation event, Brooks claimed to have moved to Philadelphia two years ago, but Politico was not able to verify that. Brooks has run for office several times in New Jersey and elected officials there were surprised to see him. “I started watching it and all of a sudden I was like, ‘there’s New Jersey’s perennial candidate claiming to live in Philadelphia and Giuliani claiming him to be a poll watcher and Philadelphia resident,” Trenton Mayor Reed Gusciora said in a phone interview.New Jersey Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman’s office also recognized Brooks. Chief of Staff James Gee added context, noting that Brooks had worked his way into being a poll watcher for the Clinton campaign in 2016. “Yeah, I know Daryl. It’s so fitting that he would be there,” Gee said.Gee said he believed Brooks was hired for Hillary Clinton‘s campaign in 2016.“People don’t pay attention to who they hire. They’re just trying to get bodies, particularly if it’s a white organizer,” said Gee, who’s Black. “And this time apparently, I guess he was on the Republican side of the watchers.“- Advertisement – To recap, on Saturday Donald Trump announced via Twitter that his lawyers would be having a press conference at the upscale Four Seasons Hotel in Philadelphia. That tweet was quickly replaced with one saying the location was the Four Seasons Total Landscaping company in Philadelphia, located in an industrial area next to the Fantasy Island adult store and a crematorium. As if that weren’t bad enough, Politico reports New Jersey political reporters instantly recognized one of Rudy Giuliani’s key “witnesses” as Daryl Brooks, a New Jersey man who went to prison in 1988 after a sex offender conviction. He was convicted of exposing himself to two girls, ages 7 and 11 years old. – Advertisement – The campaign has never fully explained why they chose this location, but the most obvious answer is someone from the campaign just straight-up screwed up and they all went with it to save face. Take a look at some of the Trump supporters who turned out at the landscaping company next to the adult store and across the street from the crematorium. xcenter_img What a way for this to end, huh?- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Charming and spacious home on the market in Tarragindi

first_imgThe outdoor deck enjoys beautiful views.The property spans two levels, with three of the bedrooms upstairs, as well as the kitchen and entertainer’s deck, which captures sweeping views of the city.Downstairs is the fourth bedroom with a full bathroom and walk-in robe perfect for dual living, a teenager’s retreat or guest bedroom. There’s also a family room on this level and two store rooms and workshop.Mrs Buckley said she and her husband would miss the location, the views and the afternoon breezes that flow through.“The doggies will miss the children walking by every day,” she said.The property is being marketed by Jane Elvin from LJ Hooker Annerley Yeronga for offers over $1.295 million. The kitchen at 73 Orford St, TarragindiMore from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020The spacious four-bedroom, three-bathroom property on a 759sq m block is surrounded by prestigious homes and schools.It has become too big for the Buckleys and their two “fur babies”, so the couple has decided it’s time to downsize.“We built it for resale rather than just for something to suit ourselves, that’s why it’s a much larger house,” Mr Buckley said.“The yard is quite extensive — good for a family, but for us it’s a lot of work.” The home at 73 Orford St, TarragindiWHEN Alan and Yvonne Buckley bought their home in one of Brisbane’s most sought-after postcodes in the early 1990s, they had two choices.They could either renovate the existing 1950s house or build a new one for half the cost.They chose the latter, but took painstaking care to design a home that replicated the character and charm of yesteryear the original house exuded.“We wanted it to have a Queensland, colonial-style feel to it,” Mr Buckley said.“Inside, we had yesteryear cornices specially moulded.”Perched high on Weller’s Hill in one of Tarragindi’s premier streets, the home at 73 Orford St is certainly something special.last_img read more

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When Alzheimer’s turns violent

first_img Share 67 Views   no discussions Tweet Share Sharecenter_img Sharing is caring! HealthLifestyle When Alzheimer’s turns violent by: – March 31, 2011 Roxanna Zamora, seen here with her brother Brian Zamora, take care of their 81-year-old mother Peggy Zamora at home.(CNN) — One minute, Sam Cohen, 80, points to photos of his kids and talks about how his son wanted to become an actor. The next minute, he unravels.Cohen, a former New Jersey taxi driver and ironworker, is convinced his family will steal his money. He talks about escaping to Israel. He ignores his grown children’s pleas to take his medication — he tells them they’ve been brainwashed. And he threatens his wife, Haya.“He is starting to make Charlie Sheen look rational,” said his son, Michael Cohen, about his dad’s Alzheimer’s disease.Earlier this month, he went from paranoid to physically violent. An attack on Haya put Cohen in a hospital psych ward.Sometimes, verbal rants, as in Cohen’s case, escalate, leaving families in a bind. What can you do when your loved one with Alzheimer’s becomes physically aggressive?To share patient experiences, asked the how they have dealt with the challenges of Alzheimer’s. Some described being cursed, kicked, slapped and bitten by their loved ones, who cannot understand their actions because of their disease.Alzheimer’s patients are often vulnerable and fragile, but in rare cases, they can become the aggressor. About 5% to 10% of Alzheimer’s patients exhibit violent behavior. It’s unclear why the outbursts occur in certain patients.“If you don’t understand what’s happening because your brain is not functioning, it can be scary,” said Beth Kallmyer, senior director of constituent services at Alzheimer’s Association. “It’s normal human behavior. You might act out, become agitated, or violent if you don’t know what’s going on.”Earlier this month, Cohen, who got an Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis in 2010, got into a heated argument with his wife. He snatched a pot from the kitchen and smashed the glass of water his wife had been holding. The glass shards cut her hands and she called 911.“We’re at a loss,” his son said. His father had never before behaved in such a way.“It’s like the ‘Invasion of the Body Snatchers,’” said the younger Cohen, who submitted an iReport about his family’s struggles. “It looks like Dad, sounds like Dad, but it’s not Dad.”His mother continues to be his primary caregiver, but is “very nervous just about being around him,” Cohen said.While the younger Cohen is also anxious about his father’s behavior, the family agreed. “We don’t want to just warehouse him.”“We feel pretty alone and we don’t know what to do,” Cohen said. “The hard thing is getting my mom to heed the advice of experts — even though he got violent with her — she doesn’t really take advice from experts. So nothing’s being done.”Caregivers are often overwhelmed and being on call round-the-clock leaves their patience in tatters. They may deny the problem, although aggressive behavior often reoccurs.In 2008, a 74-year-old Kentucky woman with Alzheimer’s shot her daughter-in-law with a gun hidden in the home. A Connecticut woman was fatally beaten with a hammer by her 85-year-old husband, who had Alzheimer’s.The violent behavior leaves caregivers conflicted about their own safety.It was a struggle for Roxanna Zamora, who takes care of her 81-year-old mother, Peggy Zamora, at their Virginia home.Although Peggy Zamora was fiercely protective of her bichon frise, Angel, she became violent because of Alzheimer’s.Starting in 2008, Zamora who has Alzheimer’s, would curse and berate hired caregivers, hurl objects at them and lock them out of the house. Every day, she would kick, bite or punch whenever her daughter and son-in-law, Jack Riegel, tried to help her undress or use the restroom.“She understood that this was total loss of dignity,” said Riegel, who submitted several iReports. “She had no control over it. I think the problem was she understood enough and had no way to lash out except physically.”They would dodge her blows. They kept objects out of reach so she couldn’t throw them. They hid all the knives in the house.“Of course it was pretty disturbing,” said her daughter. “It was hard to feel close to her, because she was so combative and mean sometimes. You just have to keep remembering it is a disease.”They noticed her striking her beloved dog, Angel, with enough ferocity to knock the bichon frise over. Her violent period lasted almost 18 months. They had to keep an extra eye on the pets to make sure it didn’t happen again.Earlier in her life, Zamora had been an adventurous woman who had become a licensed pilot in her teenage years and raised five kids in El Salvador. She trotted the globe, visiting more than 50 countries.Now, she could barely navigate her house.Zamora would wake up in the night sobbing, insisting that a little girl had just been dragged into a barn and killed.The stories grew more elaborate and horrifying, she sometimes was inconsolable.Those symptoms eased after her neurologist prescribed antidepressants.Today, Zamora is seems to be more peaceful.The challenges of Alzheimer’s never wane, the iReporters said. They’ve joined support groups, reached out to local organizations and sought weekly breaks. They stressed the need to find a good doctor and help with caregiving.For emergency situations that could become violent, Alzheimer’s experts offered these tips to placate a patient. 1. Back down.Most of the time, the incident escalates when the patient does not want to do tasks such as undress, brush teeth or bathe.“No one ever died from not bathing,” said Geri Hall, advanced practice nurse at the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute in Phoenix, Arizona. “Relax and calm down about it. If the patient means no, they mean no, and you have to heed that.”Patients lose their ability to reason, so don’t try to negotiate. Try again later when the person’s mood has improved.2. When the patient is upset, apologize — even when it’s not your fault.“You apologize because the patient is upset,” Hall said. Using this strategy will buy you time and good will.Don’t argue with an Alzheimer’s patient, because you can’t win. Don’t physically force the person to do anything, she warned. This could worsen the situation and possibly injure all parties involved.3. When the patient becomes agitated, change the topic.Move to another room to see the birds or something he or she usually enjoys. Talk about something the person enjoys while remaining calm.“If you can stay calm, you can mirror that calmness back to them,” Kallmyer of the Alzheimer’s Association advised.4. Keep in mind that the world is distorted for an Alzheimer’s patient.The patient is sensitive to noise and easily fatigued.“They become exhausted trying to follow on a day-to-day basis,” Hall said. “Without a rest period, it’s like you didn’t get a toddler to nap. They are increasingly irritable and they are confused late in the day. That’s called a sundown syndrome — when they may become agitated and aggressive.”5. Call for help.Call 911, if the patient or you are at risk for injuries. When a patient sees a uniform, he or she is likely to feel reassured about his or her safety, Hall said.Source: CNN Newslast_img read more

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